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January 12, 2002
1659 IST

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Musharraf himself writing speech - officials

Pakistan President Gen Pervez Musharraf kept himself busy writing the speech he would be delivering on Saturday evening highlighting his regime's plans to curb terrorism.

His much-awaited speech on national television and radio is scheduled at 2000 hours (IST), according to Pakistan's state television.

Pakistani officials were on Saturday quoted as saying in the media in Islamabad that the General was on Friday busy writing his own speech.

Speculating on its contents, The News daily said Musharraf was expected to announce some radical decisions to eliminate terrorism and establish military courts for speedy disposal of terrorism-related cases.

"The establishment of military courts for speedy disposal of terrorism-related cases, sectarian violence and other cases of heinous crimes" was discussed at a meeting, a senior official told the paper.

The official ruled out any action under foreign pressure, saying: "I think whatever would be announced that would be made in the supreme national interest."

Leading political parties expect Gen Musharraf to announce some concrete measures to restore democracy besides reiterating his resolve to hold the general elections this October, the daily said.

The Dawn said no key shift was expected in Pakistan's stand on Kashmir. It quoted officials as dispelling any chances Musharraf making fundamental changes to the Kashmir policy but he was expected to reiterate his position to resolve the problem through a dialogue with India.

RELATED REPORT:
Musharraf discussed his speech with Colin Powell: Boucher

Complete Coverage: The Attack on Parliament

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