HOME
NEWS
BUSINESS
MOVIES
SPORTS
CRICKET
GET AHEAD
SHOPPING
rediff NewsApp
Rediff News
All News

NewsApp (Free)

Read news as it happens
Download NewsApp
Rediff.com  » News » Lebanon crisis: Who is to blame?

Lebanon crisis: Who is to blame?

ShareComment
Text size:  A   A   A
August 03, 2006 12:58 IST
Ignoring appeals from the international community for a ceasefire, Israel continues its relentless attack on southern Lebanon.

The Israeli onslaught is in response to the firing of rockets on its cities and towns -- and the killing of eight Israeli soldiers and the abduction of two other soldiers on July 12 -- by the Lebanese militia Hezbollah.

More than 800 Lebanese civilians, including many children, have been killed so far in the Israeli attacks. Thousands of Lebanese have been forced to flee their homes, compelled to live in unimaginable squalor. Beirut's international airport has been bombed, a naval blockade has been imposed on Lebanon, bridges and roads leading to Beirut have been destroyed.

The Hezbollah, banned as a terrorist outfit by the United States and five other nations, is now seen as a resistance force by citizens in many Arab nations, who see it as standing up to Israeli force.

Israeli Defence Minister Amir Peretz says there will be no let-up in his country's military campaign until a multinational force is assigned to use force against Hezbollah -- which is known to be supported by Iran and Syria -- if it broke the terms of any ceasefire agreement.

Who is responsible for the latest crisis in the Middle East? Israel or Hezbollah?

Do you think the Israeli response is much too brutal in targeting innocent Lebanese civilians and children?

Why is the United States refusing to intervene in the conflict and and bring about a ceasefire?

Will Israel's failure to destroy Hezbollah's rockets and weapons undermine its authority and power in the Middle East, encouraging other terrorist organisations to target Tel Aviv and Jerusalem?

Will the war in Lebanon have major repercussions around the world for years to come?

Tell us what you think.

ShareComment

More from rediff

It's free!

To get such articles in your inbox